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Photo of the Day: We chanced upon this charming town while driving en route from Munich to Salzburg. The castle sitting on top of the hill looked majestic while the houses along the river looked so colourful and quaint.

Burghausen Castle, which has a length of over 1,000 metres, is one of the longest castle complexes in the world, sitting along a narrow ridge above the town. Photo taken with a Sony A7 with Vario-Tessar T* FE 24-70mm F4 ZA OSS full-frame E-mount zoom lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

Burghausen Castle, which has a length of over 1,000 metres, is one of the longest castle complexes in the world, sitting along a narrow ridge above the town. Photo taken with a Sony A7 with Vario-Tessar T* FE 24-70mm F4 ZA OSS full-frame E-mount zoom lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

We were driving from Munich to Salzburg when we chanced upon the quaint little town right beside the fast flowing Salzach River, which marks the border between Germany and Austria in these parts.

The route that we were driving was a bit off the beaten track and we hadn’t expected to come across any touristy places along the way.

So imagine our surprise when we drove into this charming little town that was obviously a tourist destination.

After driving across the bridge straddling the Salzach, we stopped by the river bank and snapped some photos of Burghausen and its castle from across the river.

We didn’t realise at that time that by crossing the bridge, we had crossed from Germany into Austria, and that we were snapping photos of the German town from the Austrian bank.

The Austrian village on the other side of the river is called Ach and is so tiny you won’t find it if you do a search for it on Google Maps, although it’s actually marked on the map.

View of Burghausen Town across the Salzach River. By driving across the bridge, one crosses from Germany into Austria. Photo taken with a Sony A7 with Vario-Tessar T* FE 24-70mm F4 ZA OSS full-frame E-mount zoom lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

View of Burghausen Town across the Salzach River. By driving across the bridge, one crosses from Germany into Austria. Photo taken with a Sony A7 with Vario-Tessar T* FE 24-70mm F4 ZA OSS full-frame E-mount zoom lens. Photo credit: John Tan.

Anyway, we didn’t stop to visit, but the castle looked remarkably well-preserved, with its external ring walls still almost intact.

The Sony A7 compact full-frame mirrorless system camera - to which we entrusted our vacation memories. This photo was taken with a Samsung Galaxy S5 under dim cafe light.

The Sony A7 compact full-frame mirrorless system camera – to which we entrusted our vacation memories. This photo was taken with a Samsung Galaxy S5 under dim cafe light.

Apparently, the massive stronghold was one of the most effective fortresses in Bavaria and belonged to the Bavarian Wittelsbachs.

Settled in prehistoric times, the existing stone buildings from the 11th century were enlarged in the 13th century into a residence before further enlargement and fortification in the 15th century by three generations of Wittelsbachs transformed it into its present form.

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